letsgetreadytocrumble:

Episode One, Part Nineteen.

letsgetreadytocrumble:

Episode One, Part Nineteen.

yeah these are nice though (btw point of fact theres a print of yrs on my bedroom wall it is a constant conversation piece)

yeah these are nice though (btw point of fact theres a print of yrs on my bedroom wall it is a constant conversation piece)

(Source: nikkigraziano)

philsandifer:

bowiesongs:

memories of the struggle, 2011-2014

You know the worst and cruelest thing about the phrase “Volume One?”

The word “two.”

(Can’t wait to read it.)

rip chris’ desire to hear “dont sit down”

hellyeahsliders:

prettylittleparadox:

hellyeahsliders:

patron-saint-of-the-denial:

alright — time to add Jerry O’Connell’s real-life/mediocre actor of a brother to the team of SLIDERS

He might not be a great actor, but at least Colin was interesting. Not like Maggie. Her entire character was sex appeal. 

Whoops, sorry I turned this into a Maggie bash.

So apparently Sabrina Llyod (Wade) Thought the same thing, and started not getting along with the people in charge, and they ended up writing her off the show in that really disgusting way (Trapped at a Breeding camp, aka, getting raped every day) and I just think that is fucking awful.

Oh definitely. I think that was the producers way of saying thank you to Sabrina for her years of service to the show. Keep in mind that producer was David Peckinpah so honestly I didn’t expect anything less from him.

Let’s back up. Obviously Peckinpah’s handling of Wade was atrocious, and forced the show into damage control mode because of one line he thought was “funny.” The only reason we even had the episode “The Dying Fields” is because of one throwaway line of dialogue. Peckinpah is a capable action-television director. He’s even fine as a writer, from a plot standpoint (“Murder Most Foul” is a highlight of Season Three, deal with it.) But dialogue and especially humor was never his strong suit. And exceedingly unfortunately, that weakness often resulted in casually sexist garbage.

As for Colin— Charlie O’Connell has an extremely limited range. That’s inarguable. But the problem doesn’t really lie with him— it lies with a production team that is unwilling/unable to write scripts that play to the strengths he does have. 

Marc Zicree understood this range— just look at “O Brother Where Art Thou” and then “Slidecage.” “O Brother” has Colin played slightly slapstick, the “bumpkin in the future” cliché. Which could have been fine, but Charlie doesn’t really play it well. He plays it too camp, which ends up being egg in his face.

But in “Slidecage,” he gets some of the only real meat in the episode— he gets a speech where he talks about everyone in his family dying of flu. And it’s brilliant. Charlie O’Connell can do quiet rage. That’s where he’s best. Quietly burning against the injustices of the universe. But no other writer than Zicree ever tries to work with that, so Colin ends up this eternal nimrod, and Charlie just can’t elevate the character past it— that isn’t where his strength lies.

Maggie, though. Maggie is the most underappreciated character on the show (outside of Mallory, who is actually awesome.) Yes, her character in season three was awful. She was mean, and terrible, and the worst, and not actually a real human being.

But the show veered away from that immediately. Production worked really hard to make Maggie into a workable character, without straying too far from her original concept. And it worked. By Season Five, Maggie is a good person, with a clear set of motivations and internal struggles. And the staff, way more often than not, writes Maggie towards Kari Wuhrer’s strengths. She too is limited. When the show writes her as the action hero they thought she wanted, it’s silly. But when the show gives us stories that follow up on her recently deceased husband, she really sings. It gives Kari something more to do than just quip. 

And yes, often the show would occasionally try to steer Kari back towards “sex appeal.” But it is to the everlasting credit of the production team that the sexist trash of “The Breeder” never ever fucking happened again. They knew they had more than just a pair of 18-34 demographic-baiting breasts. 

Sliders is an extremely flawed show. It’s a show that’s worth reading too far into sometimes. Amidst the ample garbage, there’s gold. 

skeletongrazed:

shout out to the peaceful skeleton communitity

gpoy?

(via artykj)

brainframe:

Ian McDuffie and Emily Hutchings offer this preview to their performance, a conversation about the Self, at Brain Frame 19, our 3rd Anniversary and GRAND FINALE on Saturday, August 9th. Tickets available HERE.

brainframe:

Ian McDuffie and Emily Hutchings offer this preview to their performance, a conversation about the Self, at Brain Frame 19, our 3rd Anniversary and GRAND FINALE on Saturday, August 9th. Tickets available HERE.

Paul McCartney: The Long and Winding Q&A

swvlswvl:

The other day, sitting in a hotel room in Albany, I picked up my phone and heard “Hi, it’s Paul” in a familiar North English accent. I spent the next hour in a free-flowing conversation with Paul McCartney about his latest dance-music dabblings, his summer holiday in Ibiza, his triumphant return to the road after a health scare, why he has no intention to retire anytime soon, his crystal-clear memories of the past – and lots and lots more.

Click through to read the full 3200-word interview.

"It’s not like Phish, you know?"

letsgetreadytocrumble:

Episode One, Part Sixteen.

"everyone go hang out with each other"

letsgetreadytocrumble:

Episode One, Part Sixteen.

"everyone go hang out with each other"

moviebuddiespodcast:

Hey, look! It’s Movie Buddies Episode 2 - The Social Network / Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. 
This time we are joined by special guest Nicolas Menard.  In this episode we talk about The Social Network, Girl with the Dragon tattoo, Newgrounds, animation film festivals, and social media in general.  Thanks for listening!
CLICK HERE TO LISTEN

YAHHHHHHHHHHHHHOOOOOOO

moviebuddiespodcast:

Hey, look! It’s Movie Buddies Episode 2 - The Social Network / Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

This time we are joined by special guest Nicolas Menard.  In this episode we talk about The Social Network, Girl with the Dragon tattoo, Newgrounds, animation film festivals, and social media in general.  Thanks for listening!

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN

YAHHHHHHHHH


HHHHOOOOOOO

(via sean-buckelew)

ashcanranting:

circlingskeleton:

oneweekoneband:

"The Gallery," by Joni Mitchell, from Clouds

This is one of my favorite songs of Clouds, which doesn’t, I don’t think, get nearly enough attention. Sometimes when I listen to her sing, I get this immense swelling feeling of pride, because listen to her go! The man in this song is another archetype, the anti-hero, delighting in his own callousness, who finds a way to “be gentle” with the heroine, who stays gently at home while he’s out with his Josephine. Joni has just had, frankly, quite enough of this man.

A cursory search tells me that this song is about Leonard Cohen (who is, I’ll argue, a worse lyricist than Joni Mitchell for all the praise he gets, but whatever), who did indeed have a brief Scientology stint.

Also about Leonard Cohen is the just-as-brilliant song off Clouds That Song About the Midway,” which was covered by Bonnie Raitt, which is worth listening to

That’s about what I have to say about Clouds as an album — “Both Sides Now" is lovely but not, frankly, all that interesting to me within the larger sweep of her work, except maybe when talking about "The Circle Game," which we will do — so we’ll move on to Ladies of the Canyon.

Joni Mitchell week continues in its unrelenting goal to casually poo on tight songs. Today’s victim is Both Sides Now.

(for the record i regret pooing on miracle goodnight during my week that song is not poo)

Whoa, dude, I’m not insulting it as a song! It’s a great song! I just only have one freaking week to talk about Joni Mitchell’s entire discography, and if I spent three days on her first two albums, that would be just totally disproportionate. Like, ideally, I would have a long scroll on which I could compose odes to every single thing she’s ever written, but they don’t sell those around here.

I stand by my review of “My Old Man,” though. Dated as heck

Oh, I am joking! I promise! I would never use the word ‘poo’ in a serious critique. Truly, If I was serious, it would mean that I wasn’t reading it at all, and missing the point of the entire week, which is to carve an alternate narrative of Joni’s work– which is necessary, and infinite! This week is so far great, and is a part of what makes OW/OB essential! (I will still defend “My Old Man,” tho. And Leonard Cohen.) I am very excited to see what you have to say about Court & Spark and Hejira, perhaps my faves, and if The Sire of Sorrow makes a cameo!

oneweekoneband:

"The Gallery," by Joni Mitchell, from Clouds

This is one of my favorite songs of Clouds, which doesn’t, I don’t think, get nearly enough attention. Sometimes when I listen to her sing, I get this immense swelling feeling of pride, because listen to her go! The man in this song is another archetype, the anti-hero, delighting in his own callousness, who finds a way to “be gentle” with the heroine, who stays gently at home while he’s out with his Josephine. Joni has just had, frankly, quite enough of this man.

A cursory search tells me that this song is about Leonard Cohen (who is, I’ll argue, a worse lyricist than Joni Mitchell for all the praise he gets, but whatever), who did indeed have a brief Scientology stint.

Also about Leonard Cohen is the just-as-brilliant song off Clouds That Song About the Midway,” which was covered by Bonnie Raitt, which is worth listening to

That’s about what I have to say about Clouds as an album — “Both Sides Now" is lovely but not, frankly, all that interesting to me within the larger sweep of her work, except maybe when talking about "The Circle Game," which we will do — so we’ll move on to Ladies of the Canyon.

Joni Mitchell week continues in its unrelenting goal to casually poo on tight songs. Today’s victim is Both Sides Now.

(for the record i regret pooing on miracle goodnight during my week that song is not poo)

Yeah, putting a dinosaur in the middle of London isn’t going to help people not make Pertwee connections.

But hey, as a tiny little sizzle reel, we’re at least going to get some great looking monsters! Was that like, a samurai Cyberman? Maybe! And that robo-gentleman? That looked cool! And hey, Daleks! Why not!

That sounds sarcastic, but you know I am still excited for it.

How could I not? Especially combining the ideas that A) it looks like they’re really pushing the “darkness” angle, and B) Gareth Roberts has an episode, which makes me hope those equal C) Roberts pulls a “Highest Science” and turns that darkness on its head.

Ooh, yeah. I’m jazzed. 

oneweekoneband:

Let’s open with a confession: some of Joni Mitchell’s work sounds dated. This is a reality that we can acknowledge from within the confines of our love for her — is it really possible to listen to “My Old Man” without cringing at least slightly? I’ve never been able to. It’s a testament to what a long way we’ve come, baby, that we’re able to look at a woman who was revolutionary for her time, shrug, and say “a bit overly traditional, right?”
The majority of Mitchell’s work, however, is fundamentally lasting — just look at how Blue still plays in dorms all over the country, every generation finding something of themselves in Joni’s words. This week, I want to examine those elements of Joni’s work that still affect people so deeply and just why they’re able to do so. She’s a shockingly emotional writer, unafraid to put herself on display and examine her own shortcomings in front of the world, and we all respond to that.
Joni Mitchell’s music has been my own background since I was six years old, and growing up has seemed like understanding a bit more what she means with every passing year. I think I’ve learned what the woman who knew his devils and his deeds meant in “A Case of You,” but I’m nowhere near old enough for “Clouds” to be anything more than something I know I’ll understand some day, far from now.
Joni’s a music innovator and a lyrical genius, and I’m honored to be here this week, trying to boil my overwhelming love for her work into a few posts, and a little bit intimidated by the task. I’m going to examine her oeuvre chronologically, because of how interesting the thing is when viewed as a process — how did we get from “Born to Take the Highway” to “The Dry Cleaner from Des Moines”? Where does the essence of her work lie? When I say Joni Mitchell, do most people think “All I Want” or “Michael from Mountains” or “Woodstock” or “Big Yellow Taxi” or “Come in from the Cold”? How is it possible that all of those songs have sounds very distinct musically from each other, and not all of Joni Mitchell’s genre explorations are included in that list? How much does a normal person cry at the song “River,” and how much do I need to dial it back?
I doubt I’ll answer any of those questions this week. But I’m so glad to have the opportunity to try.

Whoa, don’t you be stepping on My Old Man, there.

oneweekoneband:

Let’s open with a confession: some of Joni Mitchell’s work sounds dated. This is a reality that we can acknowledge from within the confines of our love for her — is it really possible to listen to “My Old Man” without cringing at least slightly? I’ve never been able to. It’s a testament to what a long way we’ve come, baby, that we’re able to look at a woman who was revolutionary for her time, shrug, and say “a bit overly traditional, right?”

The majority of Mitchell’s work, however, is fundamentally lasting — just look at how Blue still plays in dorms all over the country, every generation finding something of themselves in Joni’s words. This week, I want to examine those elements of Joni’s work that still affect people so deeply and just why they’re able to do so. She’s a shockingly emotional writer, unafraid to put herself on display and examine her own shortcomings in front of the world, and we all respond to that.

Joni Mitchell’s music has been my own background since I was six years old, and growing up has seemed like understanding a bit more what she means with every passing year. I think I’ve learned what the woman who knew his devils and his deeds meant in “A Case of You,” but I’m nowhere near old enough for “Clouds” to be anything more than something I know I’ll understand some day, far from now.

Joni’s a music innovator and a lyrical genius, and I’m honored to be here this week, trying to boil my overwhelming love for her work into a few posts, and a little bit intimidated by the task. I’m going to examine her oeuvre chronologically, because of how interesting the thing is when viewed as a process — how did we get from “Born to Take the Highway” to “The Dry Cleaner from Des Moines”? Where does the essence of her work lie? When I say Joni Mitchell, do most people think “All I Want” or “Michael from Mountains” or “Woodstock” or “Big Yellow Taxi” or “Come in from the Cold”? How is it possible that all of those songs have sounds very distinct musically from each other, and not all of Joni Mitchell’s genre explorations are included in that list? How much does a normal person cry at the song “River,” and how much do I need to dial it back?

I doubt I’ll answer any of those questions this week. But I’m so glad to have the opportunity to try.

Whoa, don’t you be stepping on My Old Man, there.

hangingfire:

notpulpcovers:

Canada, eh?
morebadbookcovers:

wordsofdiana:

corpsecaddy:

So I found this harlequin romance paperback today, and normally I just toss those right over without paying them much mind, but the cover of this one made me pause. Sure that the artist was just taking liberties, I checked out the back.

I’m dubious. I should read a passage:

It is a literal bear.
Okay yeah I’ll admit it I’m going to read this but only because it sounds like the most fucked up romance novel in existence.
But wait….

You have some explaining to do, Canada.

You guys don’t understand. Screw it being a bestseller, 50 Shades of Gray is a bestseller, this book won the Governor General’s Award. That’s the highest literary award in Canada. That’s the pulitzer prize of Canadian literature. Bear is a part of Canadian literary history.

HOLY MOLY.


Reblogging this for myself so that I remember to look up what Margaret Atwood said about this book in Margaret Atwood: Conversations. (It’s kind of funny to watch the internet (re)discovering this when I learned about it back in 1989 before some significant portion of tumblr was even born, sob.)

Sean…

hangingfire:

notpulpcovers:

Canada, eh?

morebadbookcovers:

wordsofdiana:

corpsecaddy:

So I found this harlequin romance paperback today, and normally I just toss those right over without paying them much mind, but the cover of this one made me pause. Sure that the artist was just taking liberties, I checked out the back.

image

I’m dubious. I should read a passage:

image

It is a literal bear.

Okay yeah I’ll admit it I’m going to read this but only because it sounds like the most fucked up romance novel in existence.

But wait….

image

You have some explaining to do, Canada.

You guys don’t understand. Screw it being a bestseller, 50 Shades of Gray is a bestseller, this book won the Governor General’s Award. That’s the highest literary award in Canada. That’s the pulitzer prize of Canadian literature. Bear is a part of Canadian literary history.

HOLY MOLY.

Reblogging this for myself so that I remember to look up what Margaret Atwood said about this book in Margaret Atwood: Conversations. (It’s kind of funny to watch the internet (re)discovering this when I learned about it back in 1989 before some significant portion of tumblr was even born, sob.)

Sean…

(Source: weirdbooksifind)

unspoken sex jokes between space bros